What Causes People to Abuse Drugs?

Today the United States and most of the world face unprecedented numbers of people abusing drugs. Although drug abuse and addiction are relatively different, the underlying reason anyone takes a drug is to change their feelings. Unfortunately, in today’s instant gratification mindsets, partly due to the lightning speed of the internet and all that it delivers, more and more people are abusing drugs and getting addicted because people are less encouraged to engage in things that take time and patience. 

As a result, in 2020, the United States set a record for the most drug overdoses ever. We are now enduring dangerous fentanyl-laced everything, and the quick fix often ends as one last breath.  

Drug overdose deaths in the U.S. reached another record high in 2020 at more than 91,000, far exceeding totals for the previous year. (CDC)

What Drugs Are Most Dangerous? 

The most dangerous type of drug for someone to try or use is street/illegal drug. Before the insurgence of Fentanyl, only opioids were a concern as far as Fentanyl was concerned. Today though, more and more drug dealers blend Fentanyl into all drugs. Cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, ecstasy, counterfeit prescription pain killers, stimulants, and even marijuana are laced with Fentanyl. 

The sole purpose of adding Fentanyl is to cause addiction and physical dependency. Street drug dealers know that if a person uses Fentanyl enough times, they will get physically hooked and return every day for more, just like heroin junkies have to do to prevent getting dope sick. As a result, we now have meth and crack addicts addicted to Fentanyl like never before. 

What Causes People to Abuse Drugs?

How Do People Become Addicted to Drugs?

The only reason a person will try drugs is to see how the drug makes them feel. Many younger people also fall victim to peer pressure and use it because their friends tell them to. Still, college-age individuals and even adults or professionals offered drugs also do it to fit in. Aside from peer and social pressure, the only legitimate cause of drug abuse is to self-medicate. Although many people use drugs to enhance the nightclub or concert or perform at work, they still modify who they are and how they interpret life. The following list is some of the reasons why people use and abuse drugs: 

  • Peer pressure to fit in
  • Calm anxiety at a social event
  • Enhance performance at work, sports, or sex
  • To relax or sleep 
  • Minimize stress and escape negative feelings 

What Are the Risks of Drug Addiction? 

Before a person takes drugs, they must understand the risk of getting hooked. There are four criteria that almost always exist for anyone who develops an addiction to drugs or alcohol. First, if anyone has a family history of drug addiction, undiagnosed or diagnosed mental health disorder, lives with or grew up in a home with drug use, or has endured trauma, abuse, or neglect, they are predisposed to addiction. These individuals run a considerable risk of becoming out of control if they ever ingest drugs. 

The National Institute on Drug Abuse Reports What Addiction is:

The initial decision to take drugs is typically voluntary. But with continued use, a person’s ability to exert self-control can become seriously impaired. This impairment in self-control is the hallmark of addiction. Brain imaging studies of people with addiction show physical changes in areas of the brain that are critical to judgment, decision-making, learning and memory, and behavior control. These changes help explain the compulsive nature of addiction. (NIDA

What Is The Best Drug Treatment Type? 

Today treatment methods are advanced and rely on science and in-depth research that show how treatments are effective. Evidence-based treatment is behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy, which curb cravings and provide psychological stability. Also, the new gold standard for helping a drug abuser or addict overcome their need to use is to provide them with long-term treatment and ongoing counseling. Long-term treatment means a minimum of three months and ideally six or more months of treatment. Anything less is not as effective. 

Research indicates that most addicted individuals need at least three months in treatment to reduce or stop their drug use significantly and that the best outcomes occur with longer durations of treatment. (NIDA)

Long Term and  Personalized Treatment Programs Are Here

Aria Florida offers long-term treatment tailored to the individual’s own needs. We provide cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy, one-on-one counseling, holistic medicine, motivational interviewing, and spiritual enhancing education and practices. Our intensive outpatient and inpatient program is the most advanced in personalized attention and in-depth therapy. Call right now to speak to our clinical staff to learn more about our expertise.

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